BUSINESS OWNERS

MITIGATION FOR THE WORKPLACE

Learn what you can do today to protect yourself, your employees and your customers. 

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INSTRUCTIONS FOR SICK EMPLOYEES

What do you do when you have someone working for you that has symptoms of COVID-19?

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FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR SMALL BUSINESS

The Small Business Administration has some guidance and resources for you to take advantage of. 

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STOP THE SPREAD OF COVID-19

What you can do in
YOUR BUSINESS 

CLEAN

Clean surfaces using soap and water. Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces.
High touch surfaces include:
Tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

Pay special attention to soft surfaces, electronics, and laundry.

EDUCATE

Educate workers performing cleaning, laundry, and trash pick-up to recognize the symptoms of COVID-19.
Provide instructions on what to do if they develop symptoms within 14 days after their last possible exposure to the virus.
Develop policies for worker protection and provide training to all cleaning staff on site prior to providing cleaning tasks.

DISINFECT

After cleaning with soap and water, disinfect with an EPA-registered household disinfectant. 

CDC Guide for Cleaning and Disinfecting
BE FLEXIBLE

Understand that symptoms of COVID-19 are very serious.  Anyone who develops symptoms must self-isolate and watch for emergency symptoms.  

Read tips for long term success

Instructions for employees with symptoms

Businesses and employers can prevent and slow the spread of COVID-19. Employers should plan to respond in a flexible way to varying levels of disease transmission in the community and be prepared to refine their business response plans as needed. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), most American workers will likely experience low (caution) or medium exposure risk levels at their job or place of employment.

RECOGNIZE SYMPTOMS

Employees who have symptoms (i.e., fever, cough, or shortness of breath) should notify their supervisor and stay home.
Employees should not return to work until the criteria to discontinue home isolation are met, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments.
Employees who are well but who have a sick family member at home with COVID-19 should notify their supervisor.

SELF ISOLATION

Employees who appear to have symptoms (i.e., fever, cough, or shortness of breath) upon arrival at work or who become sick during the day should immediately be separated from other employees, customers, and visitors and sent home.
If an employee is confirmed to have COVID-19 infection, employers should inform fellow employees of their possible exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace but maintain confidentiality as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The fellow employees should then self-monitor for symptoms.

REDUCE TRANSMISSION

Be aware that some employees may be at higher risk for serious illness, such as older adults and those with chronic medical conditions. Consider minimizing face-to-face contact between these employees or assign work tasks that allow them to maintain a distance of six feet from other workers, customers and visitors, or to telework if possible.

RETURNING AFTER ISOLATION

Someone who has had symptoms must be fever free for 72 hours (without medicine) and their symptoms must be improving. 
Do not require your employee to wear a mask or see a physician in order to come to work.

Employers should not require a positive COVID-19 test result or a healthcare provider’s note for employees who are sick to validate their illness, qualify for sick leave, or to return to work. Healthcare provider offices and medical facilities may be extremely busy and not able to provide such documentation in a timely manner.

Tips for long term success

This is a rapidly changing situation.  Updates and new policies are coming out daily.  Here are a few things you can do in your place of business to establish order and give proper guidance to your staff and customers

REMAIN FLEXIBLE

Ensure that sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance and that employees are aware of and understand these policies.  Permit employees to stay home to care for a sick family member or take care of children due to school and childcare closures.

Additional flexibilities might include giving advances on future sick leave and allowing employees to donate sick leave to each other.
Employers that do not currently offer sick leave to some or all of their employees may want to draft non-punitive “emergency sick leave” policies.

UPDATE POLICIES

Review human resources policies to make sure that policies and practices are consistent with public health recommendations and are consistent with existing state and federal workplace laws.

Connect employees to employee to resources (if available) and community resources as needed. Employees may need additional social, behavioral, and other services, for example, to cope with the death of a loved one.

Click here to file for Unemployment Benefits
SOCIAL DISTANCING

Social distancing should be implemented since it was recommended by state and local health authorities. Social distancing means avoiding large gatherings and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.

Strategies that business could use include:
– Implementing flexible worksites and/or work hours
– Increasing physical space between employees at the worksite
– Increasing physical space between employees and customers
– Postpone non-essential meetings or events
Downsizing operations
Delivering services remotely, through curbside pick-up or delivery. 

PUT SOMEONE IN CHARGE

Identify a workplace coordinator who will be responsible for COVID-19 issues and their impact at the workplace including flexible sick leave and supportive policies and practices.

Employers with more than one business location are encouraged to provide local managers with the authority to take appropriate actions outlined in their COVID-19 response plan based on local conditions.

HELP FOR WAPELLO COUNTY

Resources and Advice for local business 


COVID-19 has changed the landscape for many small business owners in SE Iowa. Indian Hills is your local source for advice and resources that will help you get back on your feet and back to work. 

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